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Attention Is The Key To Everything

,Attention is the key to reaching your full potential! In all areas of life, attention is the route to success. With it, you can achieve greatness. Without it, mediocrity is as good as it gets.

 

In most cases, people’s attention flies all over the place following anything and everything. Be it media, movies, people-watching, daydreaming, or whatever, typically, attention is a slave to stimuli. It’s the shiny object syndrome; attention darts off chasing the next trendy thing…squirrel!

 

Actively paying attention is a developed skill. It requires practice. Mental exercises like memory games, reverse daily recalls, and task reviews help to train the mind to pay better attention and catalog information.[1] Yet, most effective is a steady practice of mindfulness.

 

Attention in mindfulness

 

Mindfulness is a form of meditation that focuses attention on the present moment. It is also a practice of steadily concentrating attention on a thought, task, or series of activities and their accompanying feeling states. Ultimately, mindfulness is the proper application of attention.[2]

 

By observing how he does what he does from moment to moment, mindfulness helps a person deepen his awareness to reach a state of wholeness. Generally, mindfulness practitioners aim to create a more integrated life. Harmonizing the spiritual and human sides to work together so that they can reach their full potential.

 

Attention Instagram @ShenLifePack

All of that growth starts with skilled attention. Attention is the key to being mindful. And, mindfulness is key to reaching your full potential.

 

Put To Use

 

Mindfully directing attention is particularly useful in pursuing and realizing goals. For instance, a common area individuals focus on improving is their financial health. There are dozens of techniques to increase wealth. Perhaps, the quickest way to move from a state of lack to a state of wealth is redirecting attention.

 

Financial stress is one of the most common struggles. Many people spend much of their energy and attention focused on bills, debts, and not having enough money. In essence, their attention is problem-focused. The way to fix anything is by focusing on the solution, not the problem.

 

If this applies to you, a useful way to correct this pattern is to apply your attention toward the solution. Each time you notice your attention focusing on debt, bills, or angst, gently bring it back to center. Then, redirect attention to the solution…making more money.

 

Generally, we pay most bills monthly, so set monthly financial goals. Once you’ve done this, begin tracking your numbers, too. Go through your revenues for the day, week, and month. Track your numbers regularly. Whether you use a bookkeeping app or a pen and register, you need to know all of your numbers from moment to moment. So much so that if someone woke you up at 2:00 am and asked where you are at as far as earnings that month in relation to your goal, you can recall the numbers on the spot.

 

This exercise trains your attention and mental faculties to stay on top of the creative process and remain focused on the solution—the money you have coming in and the end monthly goal. Engage attention in this way to avoid falling back into the old pattern…bills, angst, and lack. Obviously, it requires actively exercising your attention, because the brain spent years operating on that track.

 

That’s work

 

Yes, at first, it may seem like a lot of effort. However, it’s not any extra work than you already exert. Your job is simply putting your attention in an ideal place—where the money comes in as opposed to where the money goes out.

 

The tension experienced when switching our attention from one thing to another is simply the termination of an old habit or breaking the habit loop. Yes, doing something different feels awkward and laborious. But, it is worth it.

 

Placing attention on the solution rather than the problem is the fastest way to move beyond any challenge. Be it addictions, relational issues, financial problems, poor weight management, or the like, by removing our attention from the problems and placing it on the solutions, we build new paths in the brain to habitually think along those ideal tracts. [3]

 

Becoming solution-focused

 

This skill of focusing on the solution rather than the problem is powerful but takes practice. As in the above case, focusing on building wealth rather than focusing on the lack of wealth is the path to wealth. This practice of outlining and tracking your growth works for all areas of life.

 

Exercise #1: Recall your goals. Take time to seriously map out any and all of your goals for the next year. Then, weekly rewrite this list of priorities spontaneously from memory. This practice keeps your attention directed to the goals desired versus allowing it to wander toward the obvious, existing problems; plus, it naturally filters the deeply rooted goals versus the superfluous ones. If you can recall these goals spontaneously, then there is a good chance they are essential…important enough to reach.

 

Exercise #2: Keep your attention in check. When it drifts off into problem-ville, make a mental note of it. Do this each day for one week. Once you have a daily average, then make a goal to lower the daily average by 5% each day. Keep re-directing your attention toward your goals and aspirations.

 

Exercise #3: Engage completely. In all of your activities, only focus on that task at hand…nothing else. Keeping your focus and energy 100% undistracted takes practice. Each time you catch yourself drifting off to somewhere else bring it back into focus; this is the essence of mindfulness or paying attention. This exercise is elementary but very effective. Whatever you are doing, do it with all of your being.

 

Try these methods. They are proven ways to “get ‘er done.”[4] Soon, you will become that which you focus your our attention on. You got this!

 

References:
  1. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160513111839.htm
  2. https://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/mindfulness
  3. https://chopra.com/articles/neuroscience-insight-how-to-break-bad-habits
  4. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_grow_the_good_in_your_brain

Erica Rogers